Gulf Coast braces for Tropical Storm Karen

KEVIN McGILL, MICHAEL KUNZELMAN, Associated Press
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Workers pump water from the parking lot of the Dadeland Plaza shopping center, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, after heavy rains in Pinecrest, Fla., a suburb of Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

Workers pump water from the parking lot of the Dadeland Plaza shopping center, Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013, after heavy rains in Pinecrest, Fla., a suburb of Miami. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee)

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — From a tiny, vulnerable island off the Louisiana coast to the beaches of the Florida Panhandle, Gulf Coast residents prepared Thursday for a possible hit from Tropical Storm Karen, which threatened to become the first named tropical system to menace the United States this year.

Karen was forecast to lash the northern Gulf Coast over the weekend as a weak hurricane or tropical storm. A hurricane watch was in effect from Grand Isle, La., to Indian Pass in the Florida Panhandle. A tropical storm watch also was issued for parts of the Louisiana coast west of Grand Isle, including the New Orleans area.

In Alabama, safety workers hoisted double red flags at Gulf Shores because of treacherous rip currents ahead of the storm.

“Now is the time for people to review their emergency plans in case conditions worsen,” Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant said. People who live in flood-prone areas should think about where they’ll go if ordered to evacuate, Mississippi Emergency Management Agency spokesman Greg Flynn said.

In Louisiana, Gov. Bobby Jindal declared a state of emergency, citing the possibility of high winds, heavy rain and tides. The Army Corps of Engineers said it was closing a structure intended to keep storm surge out of the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal — known locally as the Industrial Canal — where levee breaches during Hurricane Katrina led to catastrophic flooding in 2005.

Louisiana officials were taking precautions while noting that forecasts show the storm veering east of the state — and at a faster track than last year’s Hurricane Isaac, a week storm that stalled over the area and caused widespread flooding.

“It should make that fork right and move out very, very quickly,” said Jerry Sneed, head of New Orleans’ emergency preparedness office.

Offshore, at least two oil companies said they were evacuating non-essential personnel and securing rigs and platforms.

In Washington, the White House said the Federal Emergency Management Agency was recalling some workers furloughed due to the government shutdown to prepare for the storm.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami said Karen was about 430 miles (695 km) south of the mouth of the Mississippi River on Thursday afternoon and had maximum sustained winds of 65 mph (100 kph). The storm was moving north-northwest at 12 mph (19 kph). It could be at or near hurricane strength by Friday before approaching the northern Gulf Coast a day later, forecasters said.

In Mexico’s Caribbean coast state of Quintana, the brief passage of Karen before the storm moved north caused authorities to close seaports and some schools, but little rain was actually reported.

A few fishing camps and small hamlets along the coast were ordered evacuated late Wednesday, and some boat services were suspended for the estimated 35,000 tourists currently in Cancun. But the head of the Cancun Hotel Association, Roberto Cintron, said tourists appeared to be taking it in stride.

While meteorologists said it was too soon to predict the storm’s ultimate intensity, they said it could weaken a bit as it approaches the coast over the weekend.

“Our forecast calls for it to be right around the border of a hurricane and a tropical storm,” said David Zelinsky, a hurricane center meteorologist.

Whether a weak hurricane or strong tropical storm, Karen’s effects are expected to be largely the same: Heavy rain and the potential for similar storm surge.

Grand Isle Mayor David Camardelle, whose barrier island community about 60 miles south of New Orleans is often the first to order an evacuation in the face of a tropical weather system, said the town is making sure its 10 pump stations are ready. He encouraged residents to clean out drainage culverts and ditches in anticipation of possible heavy rain and high tides.

“Hopefully, this one is just a little rain event,” Camardelle said. “We don’t need a big storm coming at us this late in the season.”

Forecasters said a cold front approaching from the northwest was expected to turn Karen to the northeast, away from the Louisiana coast and more toward the Florida Panhandle or coastal Alabama. But the timing of the front’s arrival over the weekend was uncertain.

Grand Isle suffered damage from Hurricane Isaac in August 2012. Isaac clipped the mouth of the Mississippi River for its official first landfall before meandering northwest over Grand Isle and stalling inland. Though a weak hurricane, Isaac’s stall built a surge along the southeast Louisiana coast that flooded communities in neighboring Plaquemines Parish.

Karen was expected to pass over Gulf oil and gas fields from Louisiana to Alabama, but early forecasts suggested the storm would miss the massive oil import facility at Port Fourchon, La., just west of Grand Isle, and the oil refineries that line the Mississippi River south of Baton Rouge.

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Associated Press writers Mark Stevenson in Mexico, Emily Wagster Pettus in Jackson, Miss., and Michael J. Mishak in Miami contributed to this report.

 

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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