US troops head to exercises in Eastern Europe

LOLITA C. BALDOR, Associated Press
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A U.S. KC135 tanker aircraft leaves after refueling a NATO E-3A Component AWACS aircraft during a patrol over Romania and Poland, Friday, April 18, 2014. NATO performs daily AWACs surveillance flights over Poland and Romania, part of stepped up efforts to monitor airspace along the border with Ukraine. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

A U.S. KC135 tanker aircraft leaves after refueling a NATO E-3A Component AWACS aircraft during a patrol over Romania and Poland, Friday, April 18, 2014. NATO performs daily AWACs surveillance flights over Poland and Romania, part of stepped up efforts to monitor airspace along the border with Ukraine. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. Army paratroopers are arriving in Poland to begin a series of military exercises in four countries across Eastern Europe to bolster allies in the wake of Russia’s annexation of Ukraine’s Crimean Peninsula last month.

Pentagon press secretary Rear Adm. John Kirby said Tuesday that the exercises will last about a month, and initially involve about 600 troops.

An Army company of about 150 soldiers from the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team based in Vicenza, Italy, will start the exercises Wednesday in Poland. Additional Army companies will head to Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania and are expected to arrive by Monday for similar land-based exercises in those countries.

Under the current plan, U.S. troops would rotate in and out of the four countries for additional exercises on a recurring basis.

“We’re looking at trying to keep this rotational presence persistent throughout the rest of this year,” Kirby told reporters, adding that over time the exercises could expand to other countries.

The exercises are part of an effort announced last week by Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel aimed at reassuring NATO allies of America’s commitment to the region’s defense.

Kirby said the U.S. will likely plan other exercises and will continue to work through NATO on joint measures that could be scheduled in the future.

“It’s a very tangible representation of our commitment to our security obligations in Europe, and the message is to the people of those countries and to the alliance that we do take it seriously. And we encourage our NATO partners to likewise look for opportunities of their own to do this same kind of thing for one another,” said Kirby. “And I think if there’s a message to Moscow, it is the same exact message — that we take our obligations very, very seriously on the continent of Europe.”

Armed pro-Russia groups have occupied areas in eastern Ukraine and have refused to leave until the country’s acting government resigns. There was a burst of violence Sunday, with three people killed during a shootout at a checkpoint manned by pro-Russian troops. The U.S. has asserted that some of the troops are Russian special operations forces, and officials are pressing Russian to abide by an international accord aimed at stemming the crisis in Ukraine.

 

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