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World breaks monthly heat record 2 times in a row

SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer
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FILE - In this July 11, 2012 file photo, Steve Niedbalski shows his drought and heat stricken corn while chopping it down for feed in Nashville, Ill. Higher temperatures will reduce Midwest crop yields by 19 percent by midcentury and by 63 percent by the end of the century, according to a report backed by a trio of men with vast business experience that was released Tuesday, June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)

FILE – In this July 11, 2012 file photo, Steve Niedbalski shows his drought and heat stricken corn while chopping it down for feed in Nashville, Ill. Higher temperatures will reduce Midwest crop yields by 19 percent by midcentury and by 63 percent by the end of the century, according to a report backed by a trio of men with vast business experience that was released Tuesday, June 24, 2014. (AP Photo/Seth Perlman, File)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The globe is on a hot streak, setting a heat record in June. That’s after the world broke a record in May.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration announced Monday that last month’s average global temperature was 61.2 degrees, which is 1.3 degrees higher than the 20th century average. It beat 2010’s old record by one-twentieth of a degree.

While one-twentieth of a degree doesn’t sound like much, in temperature records it’s like winning a horse race by several lengths, said NOAA climate monitoring chief Derek Arndt.

“We are living in the steroid era of the climate system,” Arndt said.

Arndt said both the June and May records were driven by unusually hot oceans, especially the Pacific and Indian oceans.

Heat records in June broke on every continent but Antarctica, especially in New Zealand, northern South America, Greenland, central Africa and southern Asia.

The United States had only its 33rd hottest June.

All 12 of the world’s monthly heat records have been set after 1997, more than half in the last decade. All the global cold monthly records were set before 1917.

And with a likely El Nino this year — the warming of the tropical Pacific which influences the world’s weather and increases global temperatures — it is starting to look like another extra warm year, said University of Arizona climate scientist Jonathan Overpeck.

The first six months of the year are the third warmest first six months on record, coming behind 2010 and 1998, according to NOAA

Global temperature records go back to 1880 and this is the 352nd hotter than average month in a row.

“This is what global warming looks like,” Overpeck said in an email. “Not record hot everywhere all the time, but certainly a reflection that the odds of record hot are going up everywhere around the planet.”

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Online:

NOAA on June temperatures: http://1.usa.gov/1yQQQqb

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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