“Deep Sea TV”

This image provided by NOAA, shows a Gaidropsarus peaking out from under a carbonate rock, during the deep sea dive. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows a Gaidropsarus peaking out from under a carbonate rock, during the deep sea dive. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows a Atlantic deep-sea red crab mating pair. The male crab is carrying the inverted female. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows a Atlantic deep-sea red crab mating pair. The male crab is carrying the inverted female. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows a red brittle star occupies a beautiful white octocoral. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows a red brittle star occupies a beautiful white octocoral. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows an octopus. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper.(AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows an octopus. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper.(AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows an octopus guarding her eggs under an overhang in Hydrographer canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows an octopus guarding her eggs under an overhang in Hydrographer canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows an eel pout, Lycenchelys paxillus, looking at the ROV Deep Discoverer’s cameras. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper.(AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows an eel pout, Lycenchelys paxillus, looking at the ROV Deep Discoverer’s cameras. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper.(AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows a colony with bright color and full branches with many extended polyps would be considered healthy or in good condition. The red dots in the photo are ten centimeters apart and are used for scale and age estimates. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows a colony with bright color and full branches with many extended polyps would be considered healthy or in good condition. The red dots in the photo are ten centimeters apart and are used for scale and age estimates. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows a brisingid seastar rests on a small bubblegum coral in Hydrographer canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper.  (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows a brisingid seastar rests on a small bubblegum coral in Hydrographer canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows one of the stranger looking animals researchers saw in Veatch Canyon, a bathysaurus. These fish use their lower jaw to scoop in the sand. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows one of the stranger looking animals researchers saw in Veatch Canyon, a bathysaurus. These fish use their lower jaw to scoop in the sand. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows a baby octopus (graneledone verrucosa) as it moves across the seafloor as ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) explores Veatch Canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows a baby octopus (graneledone verrucosa) as it moves across the seafloor as ROV Deep Discoverer (D2) explores Veatch Canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
This image provided by NOAA, shows a shrimp resting on octocoral in Hydrographer canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub  are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
Deep Sea TV This image provided by NOAA, shows a shrimp resting on octocoral in Hydrographer canyon. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s ship Okeanos Explorer and its robotic sub are providing live coverage of a expedition running until Aug. 16, 2013, off Nantucket, that is allowing other scientists and everyday people to follow along. Until now, the world of the deep sea floor has mostly been the province of scientists where a handful of researchers would huddle on a ship and watch the video from below, take notes, and two or three years later write a scientific paper. (AP Photo/NOAA)
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